“This coming year, I'm ready to learn how to go more deeply in the Word of God so that I am able to give to people. […] There are many pastors that call themselves pastors but they don't know how to give the good Word of God to members.”

Gerald Nduwira-Banda

Program Advanced Diploma ('18)
Age 33
Ministering in Lilongwe
Family Wife and one daughter (1)

Gerald received his bachelor’s through Living Waters Church International; however, at the recommendation of friends, he decided to continue his education and pursue a diploma at CAPA. He has a specific passion for orphans and widows and hopes that the church can care for them as described in the Bible.

$100 a month provides a pastor a scholarship to study at CAPA.

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Interview with Gerald Nduwira-Banda

2017

Q1

Can you tell me a little about your family background?

Q2

Why did you decide to come to CAPA?

Q3

What are you looking to learn this coming year?

Q4

What are your future plans for ministry?

Q5

How did you you became a pastor? Do you do other work?

Q6

Do you have any prayer requests?

Q1

Can you tell me a little about your family background?

Ahhh, my family background is that my father was working as an agricultural advisor; he was working out of the ministerial agriculture and food service, and he died in 2015—he was murdered by some robbers.

But I came to know Christ in 2000 where we were going to village, preaching door-to-door, more especially in Likoma, where there is missionaries […] and they had inspired so that I could be preaching minister and to go teaching in so many ways. From there, I was working as a driver, a minibus driver when I was turning days, yeah; then from there I received a call of being a minister of God, then I applied for my school to do Living Waters International. […]

I went there for almost one to two years—that is, my academic year. Then we went for practical, where I was sent to by Living Waters Church where I did my practical. Then the other year we came back—that is 2011—but the mean time, I was going back to school; I was married. But my family had to be broken; that was my first wife.

Then I remarried last year—that is 2016. I'm married […] and I got a daughter, a 4 months old. Yeah, she's still, her name means that there is so many sufferings but God is the one who enabled me to pass those things.

We were born in seven children; I have two brothers, one working under a […] company in Malawi. He has been transferred from Blantyre. He is now in Mzuzu. My young brother is working at the college of medicine in Blantyre, yeah. My first sister is working as a teacher at the prepatory school in Area 24 and my other sister is working at a more special private hospital in Kasungu. My other sister is working at a Shoprite gateway in Area 7 and my last sister is doing business in Area 25. That is my family background; my mom was the lastborn in the family.

Q2

Why did you decide to come to CAPA?

I decided to come to CAPA because I had been to so many schools which are existing in this country. I met [two pastors who are] doing M.Div. [One] is also pastor for our church, so they encouraged me to join CAPA over every other institution.

Q3

What are you looking to learn this coming year?

This coming year, I'm ready to learn how to go more deeply in the Word of God so that I am able to give to people. […] There are many pastors that call themselves pastors but they don't know how to give the good Word of God to members.

Q4

What are your future plans for ministry?

So my future plans for ministry is just to boost the ministry in how I can get Christians to be raising orphans—having an orphanage, raising kids. Because in this country, we have so many orphans, but we are lacking in people to take care.

The thing that makes me be touched by this thing is that the task of raising the orphans was meant to be done by the church. […] [W]hen we read from the Bible, especially in the book of Leviticus, we hear that the heart of God was upon the widows and orphans, but today, the church has [not done] that thing, and we have let the others jut in and do some orphanages in each and every area.

Q5

How did you you became a pastor? Do you do other work?

I came first of all when I said I received the call I was working as a minibus driver. […] [W]hen you are a minibus driver, you try to be in frustrating positions and not be so nice to people. Then I decided to respond to the call that God called in me; that was in 2010. Within the week, I know that being a pastor in Malawi, there are so many challenges, that we are financially poor, so I try to do some business. Sometimes, I work so my wife can go back to school, and sometimes my wife sells groceries. Because for the moment I am here, I'm trying so that my financials can be boosted so my wife can go back to school, because she left school in Form 3.

Q6

Do you have any prayer requests?

[W]hen I think of doing a business, there are some hindrances that cause the business to be bankrupt. When I think of whatever business to do, so that I can—maybe I can let my wife run the business—it meets its end. That is my prayer request as of now, so that there should be grace, when I am still in my education, that when we face the challenges of paying school fees. As of now, I am not getting paid by any other, so I have not put any bread on the table. So you can see that I have so many challenges especially with finances.