“We have so many challenges, but they are part of the ministry. We know we go through those challenges; we are strengthening our faith, and we move forward.”

Edward Chitute

Program Advanced Diploma ('18)
Age 31
Ministering in Liwonde
Family Married

Edward Chitute is a full-time pastor who was once a Rastafarian. But after a friend shared the gospel with him, he came to know the Lord. He has a heart for the people in the rural villages of Malawi, and hopes to reach out to them by providing them with education and, more importantly, by sharing the gospel with them.

$100 a month provides a pastor a scholarship to study at CAPA.

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Edward explains what it's like to pastor a church in a rural setting.


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Interview with Edward Chitute

2017

Q1

How did you come to know the Lord?

Q2

Why did you decide to come to CAPA?

Q3

Have you faced hardships because of your faith?

Q4

Is there anything you're nervous for this school year?

Q5

What are you looking forward to learning this year?

Q6

What are your future plans for ministry?

Q7

How is pastoring at a church?

Q8

What are some ways that you've seen God's providence in your life?

Q9

Do you have any prayer requests?

Q1

How did you come to know the Lord?

That was back a long time—like 2002? 2003? Yes, at school. I was a Rastafarian. [A] leader of the church used to go on the mountain, chanting and other stuff and smoking. I was just like, "Let me try to live any kind of life.”

And one of the days, a certain brother came and told me about Christ, and then I accepted Him after some time of deep conviction in my spirit. I could not have a good sleep. I could not have any peace, until I decided to accept Jesus Christ to be the Lord of my life. […] There was an organization at school we called Student Christian Organization of Malawi, SCOM. That's when I started to grow my spiritual life. There was a nearby church, a local church—we call it New Covenant Church—that's where we started going to minister and then learn the Word.

So since then, after I graduated, and then I started working—and that was now 2011, when I heard God calling me—I was working as an accountant, and then after much prayer, much prayer, I sensed God was pushing me now to be in the full-time for studies, theological studies, and then to be a full-time preacher, yeah.

Q2

Why did you decide to come to CAPA?

Somebody told me about CAPA when I was at school because I studied with Malawi Seven Graces of God. Yeah, so somebody told me—because I graduated there with a diploma also—then somebody said, "There's this school; you can continue your studies there." Then I came here, […] and I got the information about CAPA, and then I was real convinced to come, and then I applied.

Is there a specific reason you wanted to come to CAPA?

Yeah; I feel the sense of knowing much of the Scriptures, digging down in the Scriptures right, and [being] the best in terms of exploring the Scriptures, knowing the Bible, knowing the Word of God. So this school is really good. I heard that people there are equipped into the ministry and in all areas of ministry, yes.

Q3

Have you faced hardships because of your faith?

Yeah, I have [been] neglected by my brothers and sisters: "Why are you choosing that? You are educated. Why can't you just go and work, and you have the money, and you help us with stuffs?" At first, it was little difficult to understand, but later they catched up after they see what I'm doing and the ministry and the church. […] But those are the challenges. We have so many challenges, but they are part of the ministry. We know we go through those challenges; we are strengthening our faith, and we move forward, yes.

Q4

Is there anything you're nervous for this school year?

I'm not yet clear, but they're saying it's one year, and then after one year, if you do well, you'll be taken into another year. But I'm so excited to be part of the whole process up until I finish because my aim is I get there, the master’s. […]

Q5

What are you looking forward to learning this year?

This year, I'm looking forward to learn the basics, really to have the good foundation of the expository preaching, where we going to learn […] how to present the message. […]

Q6

What are your future plans for ministry?

Well, my future plans for the ministry is to have an organized group of people who can have the passion to not preach only, but [get] the people organized, and we teach them the Word of God, regardless of denomination, both here inside the country and outside, to take the gospel throughout, wherever God is sending us, yes.

Q7

How is pastoring at a church?

So good. It’s so exciting, but there sometimes is so challenging… challenging in terms of the demands of the people. We preaching in the village, [a] very rural village, where […] the people have not yet [been] educated, and [when] they hear about Christ, they're like, "What? What? What are you talking about? We hear, we know these ancestral things, you know. We've been raised to know to believe this, to believe that. So why are you saying about Christ? Who is the Holy Spirit and all those stuff?"

But still, there is need [for] not only the Word. If we try to teach them to know some other stuff, like education, we can raise their standard of understanding because education really helps for you to understand even the Scriptures better than somebody who was not [educated]. So that's the big challenge: to let the people come out of their traditional beliefs and then catch up with God and Bible and [its] beliefs. So it's been a big war, but by and by we are winning it, and a lot of people they are coming to Christ.

Another challenge [is] we have few churches in the place we are ministering. People, they walk long, different [ways] to find a church. There's a need for us to expand and plant more churches for people to have the easy access to church, yeah.

What are some of those traditional beliefs that people are coming from?

They really believe in witchcraft. Their background, their parents, a lot of them are coming from Mozambique and where really there's a big worship for their idols or traditional [medicine]. You know, traditional medicine is not all that bad, but if you take it to the extent to replace God, then it becomes an idol. So they come mixing up: They come to pray, and then they go and practice those things. So that has been a big challenge. They replace the Scripture, what the whole Bible say, into what they believe. […]

Q8

What are some ways that you've seen God's providence in your life?

Really, to this far, God has been so faithful, and I’ve seen God's grace. I didn't know I can make it to go into theological school. I didn't have some people to help me in terms of finances, school fees, and all those stuff. But I see God bringing people to help me and accomplish what I have been accomplishing. Even the church I have is because of some people who went there and plant the church, but there was no pastor, so I just said, "Let me go. I'll be pastoring that church." I saw the people; they are just like without shepherd, so I said, "Let me go." Those are the people standing with me, and I have the support to do the work I'm serving right now.

Q9

Do you have any prayer requests?

Yeah. My prayer is for people to come to know Christ. And if we can have a lot of people who know who they are in Christ, I think some of the problems […] can be minimized. We can really have prayer warriors; together, we join hands. So, as a pastor, help me pray for people around the church where we are ministering, that a lot of people should come to Christ and be saved. That's my greatest need.

Anything else you'd like to add?

The school here is really good, and it's my prayer that the Lord would push people to discover it and come to attend because there are a lot of things we are learning; we will be learning that will aid us to be faithful, efficient preachers of the gospel.

Really, some people, they understand it in a different way. They say, "You know more […] things, [but] you just become somebody who is not useful.” But knowledge is power. When we add knowledge upon what we are doing, the more we are going to present Christ in a better way to the people, and I can assure you that what has been said, the gospel, has been preached. To me, sometimes I'm like, "It's not like that," because heresy is what has been communicated to the people. So if we can be trained well and have the better understanding of the Scriptures, we can present Jesus to the people [proficiently].