“When I’m doing the work of God—say, preaching or teaching the Word of God—and at the same time teaching in the secular things, like in the secondary school where I teach, I’m all dealing with their souls. I’m dealing with the lives of people.”

Alfred Kadzemmawa

Program Advanced Diploma ('18)
Age 29
Ministering in Dedza
Family Married

Alfred currently works as both a pastor at his church and a language teacher for a secondary school. Although he is busy trying to balance school, home, church, and work, he enjoys guiding the lives around him toward Christ. He’s excited to come to CAPA to dig deeper into the Bible, after previously finishing a diploma in biblical studies at a different college.

$100 a month provides a pastor a scholarship to study at CAPA.

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Alfred explains what it's like to be be working as a pastor and an English teacher at the same time.


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Interview with Alfred Kadzemmawa

2017

Q1

How did you come to know the Lord?Why did you decide to come here to CAPA?

Q2

Why did you decide to come here to CAPA?

Q3

Are there things about school you are nervous about?

Q4

How is it being a bivocational pastor?

Q5

What are some ways that you have seen God’s providence in your life?

Q6

How can we be praying for you?

Q1

How did you come to know the Lord?Why did you decide to come here to CAPA?

There was one crusade that I attended, and then I heard the message. One of the evangelists from the U.S. came preaching. He was just young. He was just 18 then, but he came with a team of missionaries. So when they preached the Lord, when they preached the Word of God, I felt like they were speaking direct with my life—and then I gave my life to Christ. And that’s how I knew the Lord, despite the fact that I grew up in a family that was a Christian, that had a Christian background, […] that kind of a family where everyone would go to church. I was even a churchgoer before I knew Christ personally, but then I thought that […] it was proper for me to make a decision, yes, to accept Christ.

Q2

Why did you decide to come here to CAPA?

I knew the Word of God through different teachings and preachings that I got from my pastor, but then I wanted to get deeper into the knowledge of the Word. I wanted to know more of the Word. Before CAPA, I attended a certain school as well. I also did an advanced diploma in biblical studies, but I felt like I really need to know more about the Word of God before I teach the people because I wanted to advance in knowledge of the Word of God so that I be a perfect teacher to the people. That’s why I came to this place. Sure.

Q3

Are there things about school you are nervous about?

Looking at the way I’ve started everything, the fear sometimes comes where I’m not very sure how tough the things will be like. […] Being the first time doing this kind of a school, I think there will be certain things that I will not be able to understand just there and then […] [I am] just hoping that God will be on my side. Yes.

Q4

How is it being a bivocational pastor?

Honestly, I have a very busy schedule every day that I wake up. Pastoring—it requires my effort to learn by the Word. I have to read the Word of God, I have to pray, and sometimes I even have to talk with people. That’s quite… I think it’s a big job. It’s a big job. At the same time, I’m teaching at a certain secondary school. Teaching there, I have to prepare for what I have to teach in class and all that. It’s not all that easy, but thanks be to God that He sees me through all that. Yes.

What is your favorite part about doing both?

The most favorite part of it is that when I come, when I’m doing the work of God—say, preaching or teaching the Word of God—and at the same time teaching in the secular things like in the secondary school where I teach, I think I’m all dealing with their souls. I’m dealing with the lives of people. I’m dealing with the lives of people. So to me it’s like, it’s just one thing. I’m dealing with the souls of people, and there are times when I meet students that are not doing fine, that are not walking with the Lord, so it’s again my opportunity. It happens to be in my opportunity to preach the Word to them. I evangelize to the same students that I’m teaching to, sure.

What do you teach students?

I teach English literature. Yes, sometimes English language. We call it Language in Malawi. It’s a combination of English grammar and English language and geography. I do this. Sure.

Q5

What are some ways that you have seen God’s providence in your life?

I’ve seen God’s providence in my life in many ways. First of all, I have told you that I work, but […] here in Malawi, in most of the times you work, but the money that you get is not all that enough to sustain you all through. But then I’ve seen the hand of God, where even the salary is not enough, but throughout I’m able to eat and able to pay rentals. I’m able to support other needy students because I also have some students that I pay school fees for. Yeah, so I’ve always seen the providence of God. I can’t really define how these things happen, but I think that’s God’s provision. And not only that—even coming to this place, I’m paying just 15,000 [kwacha] out of a lot of money that I’m supposed to pay. To me, that’s another way how God is providing in my life in especially unique way. Sure.

Q6

How can we be praying for you?

Yes, they should pray for me because it’s my desire that in these last two days I be among the team of evangelists or preachers that can take the gospel to far away areas or even within Malawi, you know. It’s a challenge, it’s a challenge. It’s a challenge where you want to [follow the] things of God [but] at the same time you want to do your own things that can help you in your life. You need the hand of God. So they can pray for me in all areas—say, academically—as I go further in my studies. Let them pray for me financially. Those that, those that are supporting—may their support not ease until I finish the studies. Those are the particular things that I would want them to pray for. Sure. Thank you.